Video shows black behavioral therapist lying down with his hands up before police shot him





A black behavioral therapist trying to help an autistic man outside an assisted living facility is shown in a video lying on the pavement with his hands up as police approached to investigate a report of an armed man threatening suicide.

The therapist, Charles Kinsey, can be heard telling North Miami, Florida, police that there is no need for weapons because the other man only has a toy truck in his hands. Kinsey pleads with the seated autistic man to lie down, but he refuses. Moments later, a police officer fired his weapon, striking Kinsey in the leg. The Washington Post, WSVN and the Miami Herald have stories.

Kinsey told WSVN in a hospital interview that he was stunned that he was shot on Monday afternoon because his hands were in the air. He also said that police rushed over to him, patted him down, put him in handcuffs and flipped him face down. Police left him there for about 20 minutes, Kinsey said.

Kinsey said he was trying to calm the autistic man after he wandered away from the facility.

North Miami Police Chief Gary Eugene said at a news conference on Thursday morning that police did not recover any weapons. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement will be conducting the investigation into the shooting.

Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle said her office would conduct a parallel investigation and determine whether criminal charges should be filed against the officer.

Previous:
US forfeiture case says stolen funds landed in Shearman account, seeks ‘Wolf of Wall Street’ profits

Next:
Additional ‘Making a Murderer’ episodes to air; lawyer says new evidence will be revealed



We welcome your comments, but please adhere to our comment policy and the ABA Code of Conduct.



Fox News CEO steps down two weeks after he is sued for alleged sexual harassment




Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.



Fox News chief Roger Ailes is leaving his job two weeks after former anchor Gretchen Carlson claimed in a lawsuit that he fired her and sabotaged her career because she refused to accept his sexual advances.

Rupert Murdoch will become chairman and acting CEO after Ailes’ immediate resignation on Thursday, report the New York Times and CNN Money. The resignation was announced in a press release by parent company 21st Century Fox.

Ailes had denied Carlson’s allegations, saying they were false and offensive.

The network had hired the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton Garrison to conduct an internal investigation. Two anonymous sources briefed on the inquiry told the New York Times in a story published on Wednesday that at least six other women had claimed Ailes engaged in inappropriate behavior. But more than a dozen staffers at Fox News have voiced support for Ailes.

Previous:
Additional ‘Making a Murderer’ episodes to air; lawyer says new evidence will be revealed

Next:
Law firms are ‘implicated’ in rise of inequality, says ‘Saving Capitalism’ author Robert Reich



We welcome your comments, but please adhere to our comment policy and the ABA Code of Conduct.



Additional ‘Making a Murderer’ episodes to air; lawyer says new evidence will be revealed





The lawyer for a Wisconsin man whose murder case was chronicled in the Netflix series Making a Murderer says new evidence will be revealed in additional episodes.

Netflix announced earlier this week that it is producing new episodes of the series, which examined the murder conviction of Wisconsin man Steven Avery, the New York Times reports.

Avery was convicted of murder in 2007 after he was exonerated on a rape charge that sent him to prison for 18 years. The documentary raised questions about the murder conviction, gained with some investigative help from the sheriff’s department that Avery was suing in a wrongful conviction case.

Lawyer Kathleen Zellner represents Avery. In a statement she gave to People magazine, Zellner said she is optimistic about the portrayal of her client’s case in the new episodes. “The new Netflix episodes will reveal all of the new evidence we have developed to show Steven is innocent and was framed for a second time,” Zellner says.

Zellner also commented in a tweet after the Netflix announcement. “The best is yet to come,” she wrote.

Related article:

ABAJournal.com: “Prosecutor’s book offers firsthand look at ‘Making a Murderer’ subject Steven Avery (podcast)”

Previous:
Video shows black behavioral therapist lying down with his hands up before police shot him

Next:
Fox News CEO steps down two weeks after he is sued for alleged sexual harassment



We welcome your comments, but please adhere to our comment policy and the ABA Code of Conduct.



Law firms are ‘implicated’ in rise of inequality, says ‘Saving Capitalism’ author Robert Reich





The author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few doesn’t want to go so far as to say that large law firms are complicit in the rise of inequality.

“Complicit is a strong word,” author Robert Reich tells the American Lawyer (sub. req.). “They’re definitely implicated. The structure of the economy has shifted, and they’re participants.”

Reich, President Bill Clinton’s former secretary of labor, makes the argument in the book—now available in softcover—that law firms and their clients use their power to shape the free market, according to the American Lawyer review of the book.

“Reich’s table of contents reads a bit like a first-year law school transcript,” the American Lawyer observes. “The ways to rig the free market fall under the headings of Property, Monopoly, Contract, Bankruptcy and 
Enforcement.”

Among Reich’s arguments: Strong intellectual property protections thwart competition. Fine print traps consumers into unfair arbitration agreements. Bankruptcy protects a bank such as Lehman Brothers, but not homeowners and college graduates with massive student debt. Investor attorneys pave the way for stock buybacks that enrich insiders and speculators. And lawyers help their corporate clients avoid full accountability for wrongdoing.

The book proposes solutions such as fairer bankruptcy laws, weaker protections for intellectual property and stronger antitrust enforcement. The American Lawyer asked Reich if BigLaw firms could also be part of the solution.

“It may be possible,” Reich said, “for lawyers in those firms to be more aware of the distributional implications of what they’re doing and bring it to the attention of clients, and perhaps advise them to choose strategies that are less injurious to the structure of our political economy.”

He then reconsidered his statement. “As I say that, I realize how quixotic it may sound,” he told the American Lawyer.

Reviews of the book also appeared in the New York Times and the New York Review of Books in the fall.

Previous:
Fox News CEO steps down two weeks after he is sued for alleged sexual harassment

Next:
Federal judge considers suit seeking gender-neutral passport



We welcome your comments, but please adhere to our comment policy and the ABA Code of Conduct.



Ex-BigLaw partner avoids long sentence for insider trading; judge notes otherwise ‘exemplary life’





A former partner at Fox Rothschild has received a six-month sentence for insider trading and making false statements to the FBI.

U.S. District Judge Cynthia Rufe of Philadelphia sentenced Herbert Sudfeld after character witnesses “testified to Sudfeld’s charitable nature and love of his church and community,” the Legal Intelligencer (sub. req.) reports.

Rufe said the insider trading was a single blemish on an otherwise “exemplary life,” according to the Legal Intelligencer account. In addition to serving time in jail, he will have to serve three years of supervised release and put in 150 hours of community service.

Prosecutors said Sudfeld made $75,000 by purchasing the stock of a law firm client after overhearing conversations about a planned merger. He was convicted in February.

Previous:
Florida judge is accused of making derogatory comments, overrelying on staffers



We welcome your comments, but please adhere to our comment policy and the ABA Code of Conduct.