Florida Veterans Benefits Lawyer

We may be able to help you or your loved one qualify for Aid and Attendance Pension Benefits from the Veterans Administration if you reside in a Florida Assisted Living Facility. http://floridaveteransbenefitslawyer.com/

The Aid and Attendance (A&A) program can provide money for assisted living health care expenses for qualified Florida veterans or their surviving spouses.

This VA program has provided monthly payments to veterans and their spouses who have high out-of-pocket medical costs, and who are disabled or homebound, to help them offset health care expenses.  A veteran or eligible spouse receiving pension in assisted living or at home, who is also receiving Medicaid, can still receive the pension benefit in addition to Medicaid Benefits.

Obama commutes 111 federal sentences and sets a one-month record

Sentencing/Post Conviction

Posted Aug 30, 2016 03:43 pm CDT

By Debra Cassens Weiss

President Obama on Tuesday commuted the sentences of 111 federal inmates, setting a record for the most number of commutations in a single month.

Obama had granted commutations to 214 federal inmates earlier this month, bringing the month’s total to 325, according to a post at the White House blog by White House counsel Neil Eggleston. NPR and USA Today have stories. Throughout his presidency, Obama has granted 673 commutations.

Among those whose sentences were commuted were 35 individuals who had received life sentences. Most of those who will be released early as a result of the commutations are nonviolent drug offenders who would have received lesser sentences under today’s sentencing laws. Sixteen of the commutations were for firearms offenses.

USA Today says the commutations are coming at a “breakneck pace” as the White House works through a backlog of 11,477 cases that …
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Staff attorney is fired after she is accused of wearing judge’s robes and ruling on cases

Judiciary

Posted Aug 30, 2016 01:24 pm CDT

By Debra Cassens Weiss

A staff attorney who is accused of wearing a judge’s robes and ruling on cases is no longer employed in her $57,000-a-year job at a suburban Chicago courthouse.

The staff attorney and law clerk, Rhonda Crawford, “is no longer employed” in her job, according to a statement released on Tuesday by Cook County, Illinois, Chief Judge Timothy Evans. The Chicago Tribune and the Chicago Sun-Times have stories.

The judge accused of allowing Crawford to take her place, Valarie Turner, has been removed from the bench and reassigned to administrative duties.

Cook County prosecutors have launched a criminal investigation that is ongoing, a spokesperson tells the Chicago Tribune.

Crawford is running without opposition for a judgeship covering parts of Chicago and the south suburbs. Sources previously told the Sun-Times that Crawford was “job shadowing” to learn more about judging when she …
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Digitization of Harvard case law library will show court patterns and trends

Law Libraries

Posted Aug 30, 2016 01:15 pm CDT

By Stephanie Francis Ward

The Harvard Law School library has approximately 40 million pages of case law, which is currently being digitized and scanned so the public can view it for free.

It’s the second-largest collection in the country, following the one at the Library of Congress. It includes civil and criminal case law decisions from every state and federal court, WBUR reports.

“We want the law, as expressed in court decisions, to be as widely distributed and as available as possible online to promote access to justice by means of access to legal information,” Adam Ziegler, managing director of the school’s Library Innovation Lab, told the Boston’s National Public Radio station. He leads the lab’s Caselaw Access Project.

The project is funded by Ravel Law, a legal search, analytics and visualization platform. Harvard agreed to give Ravel Law exclusive access …
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Sophomore looks forward to her JD, which she’ll start on as an undergradate

Legal Education

Posted Aug 30, 2016 01:00 pm CDT

By Stephanie Francis Ward

When Aja Miyamoto is a senior at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio, she will also take two law school classes as part of a program that allows people to get a combined undergraduate-JD degree in six years.

Graduates of the school’s “3-plus-3 program” save one year of tuition, and the classes taken during participants’ fourth year count toward undergraduate and law degrees, the Associated Press reports.

Miyamoto, 19, also has a part-time legal-assistant job, and she recently attended a law school function where she got to meet professors, students and alums.

“Before this, I was more undecided on what I wanted to do, but this program has allowed me to see what life will look like after graduation,” she told the news service. “Looking up to current attorneys and saying, ‘That’s going to be me one day’—that’s …
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